Myth: Egg yolk contain cholestrol that are bad for heart

Eggs do contain a substantial amount of cholesterol in their yolks—about 211 milligrams (mg) per large egg. But labeling eggs as “bad for your heart” is wrong.

How?

For most of us the cholesterol we eat—in eggs or any other food—doesn’t have a huge impact on raising our blood cholesterol; the body simply compensates by manufacturing less cholesterol itself. The chief heart-disease culprits are “saturated and trans fats, which have much greater impact on raising blood cholesterol,”

A large egg contains 2 grams of saturated fat (10 percent of the Daily Value) and no trans fats.

Only about 25 percent of the cholesterol in your blood comes from food. The other 75 percent is manufactured by the liver, which produces lots of cholesterol when you eat cheeseburgers and other sources of saturated fat—something eggs are low in.

Eggs are also filled with useful nutrients that may offset any damage done by their cholesterol content, including unsaturated fat, folate and other B vitamins, and minerals.

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