Tag Archives: barley

“Health Benefits of Whole Grains”-1

Consumption of Whole grains instead of refined grains lowers the risk of many chronic diseases. Whole grains:

  • Provide bulk in the stomach and helps prevent overeating.

  • Slows the digestive system for blood sugar control.

  • Cleanses the digestive system to keep the intestines disease free.

  • Reduces the risk of heart disease, colon cancer, and type 2 diabetes.

    Barley-Health benefit: the fibre in barley helps lower cholesterol very effectively

 Image result for barley

Tips: Can be used in soups, salads.

Corn –Health benefit: corn has high levels of antioxidants and is identified as a major contributing factor in decreasing the risk of cardiovascular problems

                               Image result for corn

Tips: Can be used in vegetable dishes, popcorn, soups, and salads

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Natural Food To Protect Against Sun

Cocoa (dark chocolate): contains 4 times as much phenols and catechins and protect skin from sunburn and skin cancer.

                                                                

Green and black teas: rich in polyphenols. And offer unrivalled action against free radical exposure which is responsible for 80% of skin aging and can boost your skin`s antioxidant protection from the inside out.

Carotenoids: are antioxidants which reduce the negative effects of UVB radiation. Green leafy vegetables are rich in oxygenated carotenoid compounds known as xanthophylls. Carotenes are unoxygenated carotenoid compounds which provide pigment to fruits and vegetables. And  activate melanin. Foods containing high concentrations of carotenes are: apricots, papaya, mango, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets.

                                                              

Lycopene: is a red carotenoid and is at least twice as effective an antioxidant as beta carotene to block UV light (has an SPF of about 3). Foods high in lycopene include watermelon, tomatoes, papaya, pink guava, red bell peppers and pink grapefruit.

Pomegranates: contain powerful polyphenol compounds such as catechins and anthocyanins which strengthen the skin`s upper layers, thus increasing its resistance to harmful UV rays.

Tocotrienols: are 30-60 more powerful than tocopherols thus, they neutralize free radical activity at a faster rate. Tocotrienols are capable of reducing/absorbing penetration of UV radiation. Barley, rye, oats, annatto oil, rice bran oil and palm oil are natural, rich sources of tocotrienols.

Vitamin C: prevents premature aging and skin cancer by warding off free radicals. The best natural sources of Vitamin C are acerola cherry, rose hip, berries, guava, kiwi, papaya and all citrus fruits.

                                                                

 

 

 

Vitamin D: it protects against many types of cancer, including skin cancer.

Green leafy vegetables: reduce risk of squamous cell skin cancer by 50 percent

                                                        

 

Omega 3 fatty acids: creduce inflammation, protect your skin from sunburn and melanoma (a deadly form of skin cancer).  Sources include Salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, algae/seaweed, green leafy vegetables, flax, hemp and chia seeds are rich sources of Omega 3 fatty acids.

Water: keeping your skin hydrated encourages a healthy NMF (natural moisture factor) which in turn, protects your skin from environmental factors. It is also important to drink plenty of fluids after sun exposure to prevent dehydration.

How much insoluble and soluble fiber should I eat?

Fibre                                                                                           

Fiber is an important component of a healthy balanced diet. Fiber is also known as roughage. It is the indigestible part of plant foods that pushes through our digestive system, absorbing water along the way and easing bowel movements. Fiber is not a nutrient and contains no calories or vitamins but necessary for a healthy and efficient digestive system.

How much insoluble and soluble fiber should I eat?

Insoluble vs. soluble fiber should be 75% to 25%, or 3 parts insoluble to every 1 part soluble.  Most high-fiber containing foods usually have both types, present in it. In other words, your focus should be on fiber intake in general, rather than what type of fiber. If you consume 25g of fiber each day you should meet your daily requirements. Ideally, you should consume 5 servings of fruit and vegetables, as well as some servings of whole grain products, each day.

Sources of Soluble Fibres: Oats, barley and citrus fruits like oranges.

Sources of Insoluble Fibres: Fruits and vegetables like apples, cabbage, cucumber with skin, grapes, peas and corn kernels.