Tag Archives: Vitamin D

Weight Loss & Nutrition Myths -2

Myth: Nuts should be avoided during weight loss.

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Fact: Nuts are good sources of Protein, Dietary Fiber,

Magnesium, Copper & also have Good Cholesterol & Low Glycemic Index which lower risk of Heart diseases. Must be consumed in moderate quantity.

 

 

Myth: Dairy products are fattening & not healthy.

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Fact: Low fat dairy products are good sources of protein which help build muscle & ensure all organs function well, they also contain Calcium & Vitamin-D required to strengthen bones.

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Women’s healthcare and Nutrition- 3

 Women’s healthcare and Nutrition

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A woman is the essence of life and an all-enveloping character is played by a woman as she plays the character of a daughter, sister, wife and mother all at a time within a span of few years. Nutrient-rich food provides energy for women’s busy lives and nutrition plays different roles during different stages of a woman’s life. During childhood, foods fuel growth. Through childbearing years, diet plays a role in fertility, a healthy pregnancy and prevention of chronic disease. In older years, what women eat can help keep minds sharp and bodies strong.

Healthy Diet Tips for Women!!!       

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High Fiber Intake– It facilitates slow absorption of glucose, which keeps the sugar levels normal in the blood stream. Fiber makes you feel full early hence helps in maintaining weight.

Essential Vitamins– Fresh fruits and vegetables are a rich source of vitamins and should be included in the daily diet by women.

Sufficient IronA balanced diet for women is incomplete, unless it is packed with a sufficient amount of iron. Low iron intake can lead to anemia and other iron related disorders. 

Calcium for Bones-Women should take ample care to include calcium in their daily diet as they are at a high risk of developing osteoporosis. Foods like curd or dahi, skimmed milk, paneer and nuts are rich sources of calcium and should be made a part of your daily diet.

Myth: Egg yolk contain cholestrol that are bad for heart

Eggs do contain a substantial amount of cholesterol in their yolks—about 211 milligrams (mg) per large egg. But labeling eggs as “bad for your heart” is wrong.

How?

For most of us the cholesterol we eat—in eggs or any other food—doesn’t have a huge impact on raising our blood cholesterol; the body simply compensates by manufacturing less cholesterol itself. The chief heart-disease culprits are “saturated and trans fats, which have much greater impact on raising blood cholesterol,”

A large egg contains 2 grams of saturated fat (10 percent of the Daily Value) and no trans fats.

Only about 25 percent of the cholesterol in your blood comes from food. The other 75 percent is manufactured by the liver, which produces lots of cholesterol when you eat cheeseburgers and other sources of saturated fat—something eggs are low in.

Eggs are also filled with useful nutrients that may offset any damage done by their cholesterol content, including unsaturated fat, folate and other B vitamins, and minerals.

Foods During winters- Soups and Oily Fish

Hot Soups          

                                                         

  • Simple tomato or chicken soup-keeps full you until the meal.

  • Soups are nutrient dense & low in calories – avoid adding lot of butter and cream to it.

Oily Fish                     

                                    

  • Oily fish are a good source of vitamin D.

  • Vitamin D levels could go down during winter

  • Source of omega 3 fats -help prevent mood swings by elevating the serotonin levels in body.

Natural Food To Protect Against Sun

Cocoa (dark chocolate): contains 4 times as much phenols and catechins and protect skin from sunburn and skin cancer.

                                                                

Green and black teas: rich in polyphenols. And offer unrivalled action against free radical exposure which is responsible for 80% of skin aging and can boost your skin`s antioxidant protection from the inside out.

Carotenoids: are antioxidants which reduce the negative effects of UVB radiation. Green leafy vegetables are rich in oxygenated carotenoid compounds known as xanthophylls. Carotenes are unoxygenated carotenoid compounds which provide pigment to fruits and vegetables. And  activate melanin. Foods containing high concentrations of carotenes are: apricots, papaya, mango, carrots, sweet potatoes and beets.

                                                              

Lycopene: is a red carotenoid and is at least twice as effective an antioxidant as beta carotene to block UV light (has an SPF of about 3). Foods high in lycopene include watermelon, tomatoes, papaya, pink guava, red bell peppers and pink grapefruit.

Pomegranates: contain powerful polyphenol compounds such as catechins and anthocyanins which strengthen the skin`s upper layers, thus increasing its resistance to harmful UV rays.

Tocotrienols: are 30-60 more powerful than tocopherols thus, they neutralize free radical activity at a faster rate. Tocotrienols are capable of reducing/absorbing penetration of UV radiation. Barley, rye, oats, annatto oil, rice bran oil and palm oil are natural, rich sources of tocotrienols.

Vitamin C: prevents premature aging and skin cancer by warding off free radicals. The best natural sources of Vitamin C are acerola cherry, rose hip, berries, guava, kiwi, papaya and all citrus fruits.

                                                                

 

 

 

Vitamin D: it protects against many types of cancer, including skin cancer.

Green leafy vegetables: reduce risk of squamous cell skin cancer by 50 percent

                                                        

 

Omega 3 fatty acids: creduce inflammation, protect your skin from sunburn and melanoma (a deadly form of skin cancer).  Sources include Salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, algae/seaweed, green leafy vegetables, flax, hemp and chia seeds are rich sources of Omega 3 fatty acids.

Water: keeping your skin hydrated encourages a healthy NMF (natural moisture factor) which in turn, protects your skin from environmental factors. It is also important to drink plenty of fluids after sun exposure to prevent dehydration.